Book Reviews of The Dark Is Rising Sequence: Silver on the Tree; The Grey King; Greenwitch; The Dark Is Rising; and Over Sea, Under Stone
My Blog / January 6, 2017

Book Review: excellent for young readers Rating: 5 stars I love this series, I have since I first discovered it almost 10 years ago. I think that if more parents knew about this series and the effect that it can have on even reluctant readers that it would shortly become almost as popular as a certain other young man dealing with magical forces that we’ve all come to know. Book Review: One of the Best Rating: 5 stars Easily ranks up among other great series like Narnia, Potter and His Dark Materials, this series just didn’t get the exposure. Fabulous. I read these as a child (80’s) and purchased them to read again now. Book Review: Best Kids Books EVER Rating: 5 stars I’ve read these books about 10 times each since I was a kid and they never get old. Book Review: Underappreciated Rating: 5 stars To any parent of a young teen or a child heading toward that age, this is an absolute must have collection. To any fan of fantasy of any age, this is an absolute must have collection. To any fan of superbly written prose and compelling plots…well, you get the idea. Susan Cooper is…

Book Reviews of A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction
My Blog / January 5, 2017

I am designing/building my own home and this book helped me adjust my plans until I had something that suits me perfectly instead of something “saleable.” Funny thing, everyone who sees the plan and my initial start is enchanted…. Forget building houses and start building homes. I also read A Timeless Way of Building, which is a nice introduction to this one. Book Review: A Pattern Language Rating: 5 stars This is an eye-opener. How form, structure and space can affect our mood, our sense of place, and our place in the communal structure are all rare insights deftly treated in this book. Book Review: A great book for understanding your world Rating: 5 stars I always knew that I felt comfortable and relaxed in some places (houses, rooms, neighborhoods), but it was often hard to put my finger on why. After reading this book, I know. It’s a bit hard to explain, but after Alexander explains the importance of, say, an entrance transition, you’ll know why even though you feel completely relaxed around Bill, you’re never relaxed at his house, which opens straight onto the street. Few books have changed my perceptions of my everyday world as much as…